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Interview Subjects Needed for
a National News Story on Reverse
Discrimination at the EEOC!

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          A major national news publication is researching an article on reverse discrimination at the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

          If you are an employee of the EEOC who has suffered reverse discrimination at the agency, or if you know of an employee of the EEOC who has suffered reverse discrimination at the agency, you may wish to be interviewed for this article.

          To set up an interview with the reporter, send your name (at least your first name) and telephone number via e-mail to eeoc-story@adversity.net    Please be sure to specify the best time(s) of day for the reporter to contact you.

          The reporter will protect your identity, and he will not cite you by name in the article unless you grant permission to do so.

          For competitive reasons, the reporter has requested that his name and the publication name be withheld at this time. Individual interviewees will, of course, be told the name of the publication and will be advised as to the approximate date the completed article will appear in print.

          Tim Fay, Editor of Adversity.Net, has spoken to the reporter and has verified his employment and his publication.  It is a well known and well respected mainstream publication.  Adversity.Net is satisfied that he will observe the highest standards of journalistic integrity in his treatment of your interview.


Privacy Statement:  No Internet communication is totally secure.   However, your e-mail message to eeoc-story@adversity.net will be seen ONLY by the reporter.  No one at Adversity.Net will have access to your e-mail contact.  Insofar as regular e-mail on the Internet is secure, your contact with the reporter will be secure.

          Also, as mentioned above, the reporter will not cite you by name in the article unless you grant permission to do so.

Publication:  The article will be released at a later time.   Adversity.Net will publish a notice of the availability of the completed article, and will publish selected excerpts here on Adversity.Net   If an on-line link to the completed article is available, Adversity.Net will also post that.


Definition of Reverse Discrimination:  "Reverse" discrimination is, of course, something of an oxymoron.  There really is only one type of discrimination.   However, the popular definition of "reverse discrimination" describes the situation where a non-minority (eg., a white male) has been denied a job, promotion, or business opportunity specifically because he or she is NOT on the government's official list of "historically disadvantaged racial and ethnic groups".  Conversely, "reverse discrimination" also describes the situation where certain government-specified racial or ethnic groups are specifically and deliberately given preferential treatment in hiring, promotions or contracting.

          For example, consider the case of Mr. Joseph Ray Terry, a dedicated and highly qualified EEOC lawyer who happens to be "white" and male.  Mr. Terry had to spend 10 years suing his employer (EEOC) for a well-deserved promotion because less qualified minorities were constantly being promoted ahead of him.  See also Case 3:  Jos. Ray Terry.


End Article on EEOC Reverse Discrimination


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*  We use the term reverse discrimination reluctantly and only because it is so widely understood.  In our opinion there really is only one kind of discrimination.